self driving cars

Fast Paced Technology

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Technology is changing the world but it means more than just updating your software.

These days most of the big companies are racing to be the first to get driverless cars on the road. I recently spoke to John Chen, CEO and executive chairman at Blackberry about the technology. Right now Blackberry's technology is inside the dashboard of 60 million cars. Chen says while the idea is exciting there are some road blocks.

“The biggest threat to autonomous driven car is the one that is not autonomous meaning that you have a bunch of cars governed by computer driving by itself and then all of a sudden you have a couple cars that are not and human error will intrude on that infrastructure.”

In addition, everything else will have to be upgraded to keep up with the times.  read more »

Apple's New Gig

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Apple is branching out from your favorite hand held gadget to the open road.

Earlier this week the Silicon Valley power house secured a permit to begin testing self-driving cars in California. According to state officials the permit allows the company to conduct test drives in three Lexus cars with six drivers. Experts say while Apple has yet to confirm the rumors about a self-driving car the latest maneuvers are fueling speculation. And while it might not be an entire car this could mean Apple is looking at software of hardware associated with the self-driving technology.  read more »

Google's Crash Course

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When it comes to its self-driving cars Google is on a collision course with motor city.

Two years ago a team of Google engineers and business staffers met with some of the world's largest car makers. At first both sides were excited about the idea of a car that could drive on its own; but soon it became clear that they were on opposite sides of the road.

People on both sides say the most recent source of disagreement is Google's latest prototype. A tiny pod shaped car with a flexible windshield for safety and a spinning cone for navigation. The car is limited to a speed of 25 miles an hour and do away with long standing features that include a steering wheel, brake and gas pedal.  read more »