Car Thieves Most Wanted

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If you're worried about keeping your shiny new car safe from thieves don't worry about that high priced alarm. Your brand new ride might be safer than you think.

The National Insurance Crime Bureau has released its list of the ten cars most likely to be stolen. A car is stolen every 26 seconds in the U.S. costing taxpayers around $7.6 billion a year. And surprisingly the cars most likely to go missing are generally older models that you can buy legally for just $3,000 on average.

Driving in at number 10 on the list is the 2002 Ford Explorer. While an SUV might not get you much as a trade in there is a high demand for parts since the 2002 Explorer has the same parts as most other Ford products. Another hot commodity in the chop shop is the 1999 Ford Taurus coming in at number nine on the Hot Wheels list. To see the complete list and find out if your car is parked on it keep reading. Staying away from the car thieves most wanted list might just be worth that down payment on a new car.

FROM THE NATIONAL INSURANCE CRIME BUREAU (NICB)
1. 1994 Honda Accord
2. 1995 Honda Civic
3. 1989 Toyota Camry
4. 1997 Ford F-150 Pickup
5. 2004 Dodge Ram Pickup
6. 2000 Dodge Caravan
7. 1996 Jeep Cherokee/Grand Cherokee
8. 1994 Acura Integra
9. 1999 Ford Taurus
10. 2002 Ford Explorer

NICB's four layers of protection are:
Common Sense: Lock your car and take your keys. It's simple enough but many thefts occur because owners make it easy for thieves to steal their cars.

Warning Device: Having and using a visible or audible warning device is another item that can ensure that your car remains where you left it.

Immobilizing Device: Generally speaking, if your car won't start, it won't get stolen. "Kill" switches, fuel cut-offs and smart keys are among the devices which are extremely effective.

Tracking Device: A tracking device emits a signal to the police or to a monitoring station when the vehicle is stolen. Tracking devices are very effective in helping authorities recover stolen vehicles. Some systems employ "telematics," which combine GPS and wireless technologies to allow remote monitoring of a vehicle. If the vehicle is moved the system will alert the owner and the vehicle can be tracked via computer.